Serious Racing at my First 5 Miler

2 May 2016

There was no pressure to run or undertake any core exercises as soon as I woke, as was my usual routine.
I felt good as I walked with my family from my home to race headquarters. To reach it we walked what would be the final 400m uphill to the finish line.
I found the 6:00 per mile starting section. There were club runners from the area beside me.
I felt a little intimidated, closed in by serious runners. But I reminded myself that I had trained on the route many times.
I made a flying start, running with fresh legs at a 5:30 per mile pace.
I was soon charging up a long hill, passing my family who cheered me.
I stayed in a group of runners as I ran the first mile in under six minutes. But my breathing and pacing became erratic as I tried to focus.
A stitch developed on the right of my stomach but I refused to let the pain slow me.
I alternated the strike of my feet, forefoot to heel.
I was soon passed halfway and heading back to the start. I ignored the water station and a previously fast runner who was now walking.
My first 5km was 18:48, equivalent to 6:04 per mile. I passed more struggling runners and felt hope I could run the race in under 30 minutes. But I needed to keep a faster pace.
As I made the last turn up the winding, steep incline to the finish I looked back. I was alone.
I avoided the potholes and gravel, as volunteers and spectators cheered me on.
I sprinted but could not catch a couple ahead of me.
I told my family that I could have gone quicker, and was a little disappointed that I was sixteen seconds from running under 30 minutes.
However, I was pleased that I had felt strong at the end of the race. As I applauded the last of the runners I knew I could improve my future performances at this uncommon distance.


Witham May Day 5 Mile 2016

This was my first race over 5 miles, and, located a half an hour’s walk away, was the most straightforward to enter. The race exposed me to many quality club runners as the race was also the Essex Road Running 5 Mile Championships. It is the shortest distance recognised by my home county, but I was not eligible to compete as I was not affiliated with a running club. I finished as the fastest non-affiliated runner and would have placed in the top 35 if I had been.

I took many positives from the race, especially my mental resolve to continually remove doubt that I would beat 32 minutes (my original goal) and not allow other runners to disrupt my rhythm. Similar to when I lived in Southend-on-Sea, my place of residence (and the familiarity of the route) gives me greater self-confidence.

Finish Line of Witham May Day 5 2016

Race Report: Hardwick 10km

Hardwick 10km

On the start line my quads and groin ached.
As I set off I ignored the distraction and focused on charging up the first of many gradual inclines.
The road was packed with runners.
I maintained a comfortably hard (tempo) pace as we navigated the undulating rural landscape.
I kept within a pack of heavy breathers as we approached Hardwick Hill.
As runners slowed I passed them by sustaining my effort level.
Only, the route continued to ascend for over half a mile.
My heartbeat accelerated and my breath shortened.
The steep path twisted until I reached the entrance to the Hall.
I saw the leaders running the opposite way.
I chased them back down the hill, past the long queue of runners refusing to stop despite the challenging climb.
Before I conquered the hardest section I was stunned.
People began clapping me. Not just spectators but groups of runners, one after another.
I could not hold back a smile. I returned their applause.
I ran hard to catch up with the top runners. But they remained too far ahead; I was alone.
No sooner had I reached the last kilometre I was cheered again.
I sprinted to the finish, to celebrate with my family and retrieve my t-shirt with “I beat the Hardwick Hill” printed on the front.


This race was the first I ran in the county of Derbyshire, the first 10km for over four and a half years, and the first held in the evening.

Although I tapered my running I played an hour of walking indoor football the day before. This made my upper leg muscles sore when I most needed them. Although my performance was consistent with my recent training improvements and past race results it was not ideal preparation.

As a warm-up event before my marathon later in the year it was the perfect experience. The Hardwick 10km was a great test of my strength and produced an inspiring and supportive atmosphere.

My mistake of trying a new activity too close to race day reminds me of an important lesson too: experience counts for nothing if you do not apply previous learnings.

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