Adapting to New Circumstances during my Second Chelmsford

18 October 2015
Soon into the race I passed the sub 4 hour pacer.
I saw my partner at the 5 km mark located at race headquarters.
At 5 miles a female competitor told me she was impressed that I was wearing ‘barefoot’ shoes.
As I approached half way I took advantage of the water, cereal bars and dried fruit at the aid stations.
Although at 17.5 miles a marshal said I was the first man that had passed him wearing Vibram FiveFingers I was struggling. I switched my running style from forefoot to mid-foot striking, until I tired and had to accept becoming slumped forward, my feet rocking.
The muscle fatigue worsened.
I saw runners lying alongside the path to the finish, reminiscent of my first marathon. I refused to succumb to my feet’s desires to rest.
I then drew alongside a runner, frequently exchanging positions, until I finally crossed the finish line.


Even though I recorded a new personal best the last hour was painful.

I also experienced mixed emotions when I received both encouragement and distractions along the route.

I was inspired by spectators calling me “Wonder Feet” and “Vibrams”, impressed by my barefoot style of running. However, another runner, a few miles before the end, joked to other runners that I had forgotten my trainers and asked whether I had practiced in them (which of course I had). 

The route had been modified from last year for greater accuracy and less confusion. Although this was much appreciated, more of the course was on tarmac, which felt more demanding on my legs.

The race proved that everything during a marathon can be exaggerated in the mind, and adjusting to external circumstances is crucial for long-distance success.

Pre Chelmsford Marathon 2015

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